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The Holidays Are Upon Us!

It’s that time of year, the weather is changing, decorations are going up, and there are a lot of holiday gatherings. It’s important to think of your pet during this season and not forget to take extra precautions during all the hustle and bustle. Here are some things to consider for your pet:
 

 

Decorations
Holiday decorations are beautiful to look at but some of them pose a potential risk to your pets. Ingestion of glass, metal, ribbons, and tinsel can cause some serious complications. Many decorations also have small pieces to them that can be swallowed.
  • Tinsel can act like a knife in the digestive tract
  • Many decorative items can cause blockages
  • Artificial snow contains a chemical that can be harmful if inhaled or ingested
  • Unattended candles can be knocked over by tails and start fires
Holiday Plants
Many common holiday plants are toxic. Common reactions to plant toxins can be vomiting, diarrhea, serious kidney damage, or even death.
Lillies are the most toxic of the seasonal plants. Be sure to keep plants out of reach or out of the home.
 

February is Dental Health Month!

dog smile

 

Oral Hygiene

Your pet's dental health is a part of his/her healthy foundation. Gingivitis and periodontal disease are a reality for your pet as much as they are for you!
Periodontal disease doesn't just affect your pets teeth, gums and the deterioration of the jaw bone, it impacts their entire general health.
The bacteria that is present with dental disease cir­culates through the blood stream and can cause damage to the heart, kidneys and liver.

Steps to a Healthy, Happy Bird

Feeding Your Bird

A proper diet must include a variety of sources for carbohydrates, fats and protein. Since seed diets are too high in fats and phosphorus and also deficient in vitamin A and calcium we recommend that commercial pellets diets become at least 60-70% of daily intake. The remaining 30-40% of diet should be fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains with­out added salt or fat. Nuts and seeds should be offered sparingly as special treats. Never feed your bird chocolate, coffee, or avocados. Often, even if provided a wide variety of foods, birds will be picky and tend to eat just a few of the items presented.

Truffles or Toxicity?

By Irene Choi, DVM                                                                  

 

 
Here in the Puget Sound Region there are plenty of forests with thick layers of built-up decaying debris and in our climate of almost constant moisture in the spring and fall mushrooms can proliferate.  Some mushrooms are a delicacy such as Truffles and Chanterelles and many people seek them out in the woods, however others can be poisonous.  These poisonous mushrooms can appear in your yard growing below piles of leaves or under bushes where you won’t see them readily.  There are many types of mushrooms and they can cause different types of symptoms that can start appearing within 30 minutes of ingestion up to 3-4 hours after ingestion.  The most severe mushroom toxicity can cause liver, kidney, and heart disease and lead to death.  Less severe mushroom poisonings can cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, hallucinations.  Many toxic mushrooms can cause hypersalivation (drooling), miosis (pinpoint pupils), bradycardia (decreased heart rates), lacrimation (excessive tearing), vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and respiratory distress. 
 

Marijuana Toxicity

Marjuana Dangers for your pets 
 
By: Irene S. Choi, DVM
 
There has been a lot of talk about Marijuana recently with the passage of new laws allowing recreational marijuana use.   Unfortunately, there hasn’t been as much discussion about the dangers of pets ingesting marijuana. 

Leave your pooch pal at home

 

AUTHOR: DIONE L.BLACK, LVT
 

       With the arrival of the summer months and beautiful warm sunny days, this is a good time to remind pet owners of the dangers of leaving their beloved pet in parked cars, even for a minute. 

 
 
 

Summer Safety

Authored By: Sarah Kenne, LVT

 

dog umbrellaSummer is officially here, and many people are spending time in the great outdoors with their pets.    Long after winter holiday decorations have been packed away and bright, spring candies have been eaten, warm weather outings bring a new set of safety concerns for pet owners.

Parvovirus Enteritis

Authored By:  Kathryn R. Krueger, DVM


What is Parvovirus?  

Parvovirus is a highly contagious disease spread by the fecal material of affected animals. The virus infects the walls of the intestines, causing the interior lining of the intestines to slough.  It is a serious disease, and can be over 90% fatal if untreated.  It causes vomiting, diarrhea (which is often bloody), lethargy (depression), pain, and life threatening dehydration. 
 

2014 Seattle Met Top Vets

We have exciting news!  Dr. James C. Little has been selected in the 2013  and 2014  list of Top Veterinarians in Seattle Met magazine!  Ballots were sent to veterinarians in our four local counties, asking which veterinarians they would recommend to provide care to your loved ones and  Dr. James C. Little was chosen for his exceptional care and expertise in small animals and exotics.
 

Stop the Scratching!

Tips for having flea free pets

By: Janet Beagley, DVM

 Fleas are a common problem for our furry friends. You may have an itchy, miserable pet that has scratched all the hair of its rear end, little rice grain segments found in your pets poop (these may be tapeworms, which often result from you pet ingesting fleas), or simply little brown specs noted in your pets fur. Fleas are treatable and preventable, but they still present many challenges.  These challenges vary depending on your pet’s environment, how many animals live in your house, and whether wildlife or stay animals have access to your yard.

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