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Stop the Scratching!

Tips for having flea free pets

By: Janet Beagley, DVM

 Fleas are a common problem for our furry friends. You may have an itchy, miserable pet that has scratched all the hair of its rear end, little rice grain segments found in your pets poop (these may be tapeworms, which often result from you pet ingesting fleas), or simply little brown specs noted in your pets fur. Fleas are treatable and preventable, but they still present many challenges.  These challenges vary depending on your pet’s environment, how many animals live in your house, and whether wildlife or stay animals have access to your yard.

Truffles or Toxicity?

By Irene Choi, DVM                                                                  

January 3, 2013

 
Here in the Puget Sound Region there are plenty of forests with thick layers of built-up decaying debris and in our climate of almost constant moisture in the spring and fall mushrooms can proliferate.  Some mushrooms are a delicacy such as Truffles and Chanterelles and many people seek them out in the woods, however others can be poisonous.  These poisonous mushrooms can appear in your yard growing below piles of leaves or under bushes where you won’t see them readily.  There are many types of mushrooms and they can cause different types of symptoms that can start appearing within 30 minutes of ingestion up to 3-4 hours after ingestion.  The most severe mushroom toxicity can cause liver, kidney, and heart disease and lead to death.  Less severe mushroom poisonings can cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, hallucinations.  Many toxic mushrooms can cause hypersalivation (drooling), miosis (pinpoint pupils), bradycardia (decreased heart rates), lacrimation (excessive tearing), vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and respiratory distress. 
 

What is MDR??


Multidrug Sensitivity in Dogs *
Drug sensitivities result from a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1). This gene encodes a protein, P-glycoprotein that is responsible for pumping many drugs and other toxins out of the brain. Dogs with the mutant gene cannot pump some drugs out of the brain as a normal dog would, which may result in abnormal neurologic signs. The result may be an illness requiring an extended hospital stay - or even death.
 
Some dog breeds are more sensitive to certain drugs than other breeds. Collies and related breeds, for instance, can have adverse reactions to drugs such as ivermectin and loperamide (Imodium). At Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine you can get your dog tested for drug sensitivity and keep up with the latest research.
 

Behavior Series: Head and Chest harnesses what's all the fuss?

By: Rachel Kuhn, DVM

You see it all the time. Those commercials trying to sell you training tools to help you have that picture perfect well mannered pet. It isn’t always possible in our real world but that doesn’t mean that you can’t have a well behaved pet that you enjoy having to walk and visit your friends with. How do you know what works and what doesn’t?

What are the pros and cons, what is available and what are the benefits of a harness?

Here at All Creatures Animal hospital we would like to help you navigate the world of training harness aids.

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