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Information for Cats

The Holidays Are Upon Us!

It’s that time of year, the weather is changing, decorations are going up, and there are a lot of holiday gatherings. It’s important to think of your pet during this season and not forget to take extra precautions during all the hustle and bustle. Here are some things to consider for your pet:
 

 

Decorations
Holiday decorations are beautiful to look at but some of them pose a potential risk to your pets. Ingestion of glass, metal, ribbons, and tinsel can cause some serious complications. Many decorations also have small pieces to them that can be swallowed.
  • Tinsel can act like a knife in the digestive tract
  • Many decorative items can cause blockages
  • Artificial snow contains a chemical that can be harmful if inhaled or ingested
  • Unattended candles can be knocked over by tails and start fires
Holiday Plants
Many common holiday plants are toxic. Common reactions to plant toxins can be vomiting, diarrhea, serious kidney damage, or even death.
Lillies are the most toxic of the seasonal plants. Be sure to keep plants out of reach or out of the home.
 

February is Dental Health Month!

dog smile

 

Oral Hygiene

Your pet's dental health is a part of his/her healthy foundation. Gingivitis and periodontal disease are a reality for your pet as much as they are for you!
Periodontal disease doesn't just affect your pets teeth, gums and the deterioration of the jaw bone, it impacts their entire general health.
The bacteria that is present with dental disease cir­culates through the blood stream and can cause damage to the heart, kidneys and liver.

Truffles or Toxicity?

By Irene Choi, DVM                                                                  

 

 
Here in the Puget Sound Region there are plenty of forests with thick layers of built-up decaying debris and in our climate of almost constant moisture in the spring and fall mushrooms can proliferate.  Some mushrooms are a delicacy such as Truffles and Chanterelles and many people seek them out in the woods, however others can be poisonous.  These poisonous mushrooms can appear in your yard growing below piles of leaves or under bushes where you won’t see them readily.  There are many types of mushrooms and they can cause different types of symptoms that can start appearing within 30 minutes of ingestion up to 3-4 hours after ingestion.  The most severe mushroom toxicity can cause liver, kidney, and heart disease and lead to death.  Less severe mushroom poisonings can cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, hallucinations.  Many toxic mushrooms can cause hypersalivation (drooling), miosis (pinpoint pupils), bradycardia (decreased heart rates), lacrimation (excessive tearing), vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and respiratory distress. 
 

Summer Safety

Authored By: Sarah Kenne, LVT

 

dog umbrellaSummer is officially here, and many people are spending time in the great outdoors with their pets.    Long after winter holiday decorations have been packed away and bright, spring candies have been eaten, warm weather outings bring a new set of safety concerns for pet owners.

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