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2014 Seattle Met Top Vets

We have exciting news!  Dr. James C. Little has been selected in the 2013  and 2014  list of Top Veterinarians in Seattle Met magazine!  Ballots were sent to veterinarians in our four local counties, asking which veterinarians they would recommend to provide care to your loved ones and  Dr. James C. Little was chosen for his exceptional care and expertise in small animals and exotics.
 

Stop the Scratching!

Tips for having flea free pets

By: Janet Beagley, DVM

 Fleas are a common problem for our furry friends. You may have an itchy, miserable pet that has scratched all the hair of its rear end, little rice grain segments found in your pets poop (these may be tapeworms, which often result from you pet ingesting fleas), or simply little brown specs noted in your pets fur. Fleas are treatable and preventable, but they still present many challenges.  These challenges vary depending on your pet’s environment, how many animals live in your house, and whether wildlife or stay animals have access to your yard.

Truffles or Toxicity?

By Irene Choi, DVM                                                                  

January 3, 2013

 
Here in the Puget Sound Region there are plenty of forests with thick layers of built-up decaying debris and in our climate of almost constant moisture in the spring and fall mushrooms can proliferate.  Some mushrooms are a delicacy such as Truffles and Chanterelles and many people seek them out in the woods, however others can be poisonous.  These poisonous mushrooms can appear in your yard growing below piles of leaves or under bushes where you won’t see them readily.  There are many types of mushrooms and they can cause different types of symptoms that can start appearing within 30 minutes of ingestion up to 3-4 hours after ingestion.  The most severe mushroom toxicity can cause liver, kidney, and heart disease and lead to death.  Less severe mushroom poisonings can cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, hallucinations.  Many toxic mushrooms can cause hypersalivation (drooling), miosis (pinpoint pupils), bradycardia (decreased heart rates), lacrimation (excessive tearing), vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and respiratory distress. 
 

Zoonotic Diseases Series # 1: The Skinny on Roundworms

By: Dr. Angela Lehman

 
What does “zoonotic” mean?
 
The term “zoonotic” refers to any disease that can be passed from an animal to a human. Certain parasites, bacterial infections, fungal infections, and even viral infections can be transmitted in this way. Although we share our homes, our yards, and sometimes even our beds with our beloved pets, one thing we should NOT be sharing is disease!
 
One important example of a zoonotic disease, especially in children, is caused by a common internal parasite known as the roundworm.
 

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