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Truffles or Toxicity?

By Irene Choi, DVM                                                                  

January 3, 2013

 
Here in the Puget Sound Region there are plenty of forests with thick layers of built-up decaying debris and in our climate of almost constant moisture in the spring and fall mushrooms can proliferate.  Some mushrooms are a delicacy such as Truffles and Chanterelles and many people seek them out in the woods, however others can be poisonous.  These poisonous mushrooms can appear in your yard growing below piles of leaves or under bushes where you won’t see them readily.  There are many types of mushrooms and they can cause different types of symptoms that can start appearing within 30 minutes of ingestion up to 3-4 hours after ingestion.  The most severe mushroom toxicity can cause liver, kidney, and heart disease and lead to death.  Less severe mushroom poisonings can cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, hallucinations.  Many toxic mushrooms can cause hypersalivation (drooling), miosis (pinpoint pupils), bradycardia (decreased heart rates), lacrimation (excessive tearing), vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and respiratory distress. 
 

What is MDR??


Multidrug Sensitivity in Dogs *
Drug sensitivities result from a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1). This gene encodes a protein, P-glycoprotein that is responsible for pumping many drugs and other toxins out of the brain. Dogs with the mutant gene cannot pump some drugs out of the brain as a normal dog would, which may result in abnormal neurologic signs. The result may be an illness requiring an extended hospital stay - or even death.
 
Some dog breeds are more sensitive to certain drugs than other breeds. Collies and related breeds, for instance, can have adverse reactions to drugs such as ivermectin and loperamide (Imodium). At Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine you can get your dog tested for drug sensitivity and keep up with the latest research.
 

HARBOR SEALS (Phoca vitulina)

 Written by: James Moore, DVM

   

Walking along Puget Sound beaches or sitting in your boat, you may see a curious earless harbor seal face rise from the water to check you out. Harbor seals are the most abundant marine mammal along Puget Sound. Although curious, they are shy animals and prefer quiet, unpopulated areas.

 

            Seals are members of the Order Pinnipedia ( “pinniped” comes from the latin word “pinna” meaning winged and “ped” meaning foot) which is divided into two Families—Otariid or eared seals (Fur Seals, California Sea Lions, Elephant seals etc) and Phocid or earless seals (Harbor Seals).

Behavior Series: Head and Chest harnesses what's all the fuss?

By: Rachel Kuhn, DVM

You see it all the time. Those commercials trying to sell you training tools to help you have that picture perfect well mannered pet. It isn’t always possible in our real world but that doesn’t mean that you can’t have a well behaved pet that you enjoy having to walk and visit your friends with. How do you know what works and what doesn’t?

What are the pros and cons, what is available and what are the benefits of a harness?

Here at All Creatures Animal hospital we would like to help you navigate the world of training harness aids.

Zoonotic Diseases Series # 1: The Skinny on Roundworms

By: Dr. Angela Lehman

 
What does “zoonotic” mean?
 
The term “zoonotic” refers to any disease that can be passed from an animal to a human. Certain parasites, bacterial infections, fungal infections, and even viral infections can be transmitted in this way. Although we share our homes, our yards, and sometimes even our beds with our beloved pets, one thing we should NOT be sharing is disease!
 
One important example of a zoonotic disease, especially in children, is caused by a common internal parasite known as the roundworm.
 

How do I know if my Reptile is Sick?

 

By: David Balderrama, DVM
 
                
 
Imagine for a moment that you and your pet reptile switched places for a day.  You are now a lizard (or turtle or snake) living in the world's smallest artificial rain forest (or desert perhaps). 
 

What is Salmonella?

By: James C. Little, DVM

 

Salmonella is rod-shaped, usually motile bacteria that is pathogenic to man and other warm-blooded animals and causes food poisoning, gastrointestinal inflammation, and diseases of the genital tract. This bacteria is extremely common in reptiles and can cause severe, life-threatening illness in both humans and reptiles.

Cat and Kitten Care Resources

By: Dr. Carrie LaJeunesse

two catsFirst and foremost, always call us with any questions or concerns. We want to be your best source for accurate and helpful information. This can include anything from what foods to feed, spaying/neutering (which we very strongly recommend!) to cat boarding facilities. If we don’t know the answer, we’ll try to find it for you!

Plants poisonous to Cats

kitten in bambooBelow is a list of plants that are considered toxic to cats.   Unfortunately it is impossible to name all of the plants so if you have questions please seek veterinary care as soon as possible. 

 

 

Basic Health Care For Your New Puppy

 By: Kathryn Krueger, DVM

You just obtained a new puppy from the Kitsap Humane Society, a pet store or breeder.  What vaccinations are necessary to maintain the health of the new addition to your family? Does your puppy have worms and can you get worms from him/her?  

 

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